Siraj Muneer

Jun 12, 2023
5 Min read
Recovery Stories

Siraj Muneer was a member of the Iraqi Armed Forces when his life changed after stepping on an improvised explosive device (IED) in 2007.

Siraj was handing out food rations and supplies when he stepped on that IED and he unfortunately lost both of his legs.

Thankfully, Siraj was selected to take part in the Invictus Games Toronto 2017 as a member of Team Iraq and it was when he was competing in the archery event that he finally felt his mentality shift and everything fall into place.

"Suffering an injury does not mean your life has ended," and he wants to spread as much positivity and support as he can within the Invictus community.

He found it very therapeutic to compete against others with similar injuries and has found purpose in sport as it allows him to continuously push himself.

"People with similar injuries are sitting at home doing nothing, but sport helps me challenge myself, it doesn’t matter who wins, as long as we show that we’re challenging life."

"Suffering an injury does not mean your life has ended, winning this medal made a big impression on me."

Siraj Muneer

Invictus Games Toronto 2017, Sydney 2018, and The Hague 2020 - Competitor

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Darrell Ling is one of the contributors to the Heart of Invictus documentary series, launched online August 30th.

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